Springtime in Holland

Day 4 - Bataviawerf workshops


A replica of a C16th Dutch East Indies trading vessel was made in these workshops


All the sailing ships of the Dutch East India Company were richly decorated by carvings on both the outside and inside. They frequently had over one hundred  pieces of carving. The massive carving at the stern of the ship was the most important as it identified the ship.

Bataviawerf

Wood or pine was used for the carving. The wood workshop is beautifully laid out with all the tools of the trade as well as examples of carved work.
 
All the ships were richly decorated by carvings on both the outside and inside. The Batavia has over one hundred pieces of carving. The massive carving at the stern of the ship was the most important as it identified the ship.   Wood or pine was used for the carving. The wood workshop is beautifully laid out with all the tools of the trade as well as examples of carved work.   Steps lead up to the sailmakers loft.  The sails were made from flax which was woven into narrow strips of linen cloth. An original loom from 1625 is on display but is not allowed to be used. There is a working reconstruction next to it.   The narrow strips were originally sewn by hand, although now a machine is used.  38 strips were needed to make the mainsail.  Apprentices had to demonstrate they had learn all the different skills and there are two examples of samples made by them. As well as showing the different types of stitching need to join seems, they also show different methods of repair.     All the ships carried cannons as not only was the Netherlands at war with Spain and England at different times, there was also the risk of piracy. These as well as ironwork were made in the blacksmith’s workshop on the site.   Rigging was made  in the tackle workshop near the blacksmith’s shop. It was coated with grease and tar to protect it from the elements.   There is a reconstruction of the hoist used to lift barrels.

All the ships were richly decorated by carvings on both the outside and inside. The Batavia has over one hundred pieces of carving. The massive carving at the stern of the ship was the most important as it identified the ship.   Wood or pine was used for the carving. The wood workshop is beautifully laid out with all the tools of the trade as well as examples of carved work.   Steps lead up to the sailmakers loft.  The sails were made from flax which was woven into narrow strips of linen cloth. An original loom from 1625 is on display but is not allowed to be used. There is a working reconstruction next to it.   The narrow strips were originally sewn by hand, although now a machine is used.  38 strips were needed to make the mainsail.  Apprentices had to demonstrate they had learn all the different skills and there are two examples of samples made by them. As well as showing the different types of stitching need to join seems, they also show different methods of repair.     All the ships carried cannons as not only was the Netherlands at war with Spain and England at different times, there was also the risk of piracy. These as well as ironwork were made in the blacksmith’s workshop on the site.   Rigging was made  in the tackle workshop near the blacksmith’s shop. It was coated with grease and tar to protect it from the elements.   There is a reconstruction of the hoist used to lift barrels.

Bataviawerf

Bataviawerf

Steps lead up to the sailmakers loft.

Bataviawerf

The sails were made from flax which was woven into narrow strips of linen cloth. An original loom from 1625 is on display but is too fragile to be used. There is a working reconstruction next to it.

Bataviawerf
 
The narrow strips were originally sewn by hand, although now a machine is used.

Bataviawerf

38 strips were needed to make the mainsail.  Apprentices had to demonstrate they had learn all the different skills and there are two examples of samples made by them. As well as showing the different types of stitching need to join seems, they also show different methods of repair.

Bataviawerf

All the ships carried cannons as not only was the Netherlands at war with Spain and England at different times, there was also the risk of piracy. These as well as ironwork were made in the blacksmith’s workshop on the site.

Bataviawerf

Rigging was made  in the tackle workshop near the blacksmith’s shop. It was coated with grease and tar to protect it from the elements.

There is a reconstruction of the hoist used to lift barrels.

Bataviawerf

<<Previous page
Back to top
Next page>>


Eleanor's Pages Index


MAIN SITE MAP