English Stately Homes and Castles - North

Lindisfarne Castle, Holy Island - Part 2


The gound floor


Lindisfarne Castle is an L shaped building which dominates the whole island. The walls seem to rise out of the stone.

Lindisfarne Castle

It is reached up a steep cobbled ramp to a small door through the outer wall which has a portcullis, worked by weights in the scullery above. Steep stairs lead onto the Lower Battery with the remains of gun emplacements used in the late C19th.

Lindisfarne Castle

In front is Lutyens ‘castle’ with a doorway into the entrance hall. The kitchens and scullery are to the with the dining room and ship room behind.

Lindisfarne Castle

The entrance Hall is ‘Norman’ with sturdy round columns and arches.

Lindisfarne Castle

On the end wall is a massive open fireplace. Above it is a wind indicator, painted in 1912. In the centre is a map of Holy Island with the defeated Spanish Armada being chased by the English fleet. 

Lindisfarne Castle

To the left of the entrance hall is the kitchen with a large cast iron range set in an inglenook. The large dresser on the right was designed by Lutyens for the castle. The older settle has a cupboard on the back which was used to hang meat while it cured.

Lindisfarne Castle

When the walls were stripped during restoration work, the remains of late C17th wall paintings with stylised flower motifs were found.

Lindisfarne Castle

Beyond is the scullery with a small sink. Opposite the window is the winding gear and weights for operating the portcullis over the entrance door to the lower battery. In a corner is a massive cast iron boiler and fuel store which was responsible for heating three radiators in the castle.

Lindisfarne Castle

Lindisfarne Castle

A corridor leads from the entrance hall to the dining room and ship room beyond.

Lindisfarne Castle

These retain their original stone vaulted ceilings designed to take the weight of the cannons on the upper battery. The dining room has a lovely brick floor. The windows are replacements of Lutyens original design.

Lindisfarne Castle

Lindisfarne Castle

The open fireplace in the end wall has the remains of a bread oven.

Lindisfarne Castle

The ship room was the gunpowder store of the Tudor fort and the small room at the end was originally a latrine but was converted by Lutyen's into a store for logs for the fire. The massive fire place used to fill the room with smoke if the wind was in the wrong direction.

Lindisfarne Castle

Lindisfarne Castle

The room gets its name from the model ship hanging from the ceiling. The bell in the centre came from steamship Locksley which was built in Newcastle and took deliveries to ports on the north east coast. She was wrecked on the Lindisfarne coast in 1938 and the bell washed ashore. It was discovered again in a cupboard in 2011.

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